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Translational Bytes
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LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION!

Translational science is all about picking the right tissue for your next in-vitro experiment. The constantly evolving landscape of translational science emphasizes the need for investigators to be meticulous in selecting the most appropriate culture medium for their clinical pharmacology research, especially when it comes to investigating mechanisms of drug action at the target tissue.  Faris and Price do just that in this week’s CTS featured original article “Reverse translational study of fenofibrate’s observed effects in diabetes-associated retinopathy.” These guys don’t just go for blood, they look at the mechanism of action of fenofibrate right at the target tissue: the retinal epithelium----the very site of diabetic retinopathy. By utilizing retinal pigment epithelial cells in their experiments, the duo was not only able to identify key genes involved in fenofibrate’s inhibition of aberrant retinal angiogenesis (which leads to diabetic retinopathy and blindness), but also to identify potential new biomarkers of disease progression and therapeutic response. These tissue-relevant, novel biomarkers can now go on to be explored in clinical trials… perhaps even be extended to relevant biomarkers in blood.

The real estate market had it right all along: location is key.

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